Councillors and committees

Agenda and minutes

In light of recent events and following the latest Government advice on the Coronavirus, the Council has cancelled all its scheduled council and committee meetings until 11th May 2020. At present the law does not permit local authorities to hold 'virtual' Committee meetings but the Council is committed to maintaining full transparency in the decision making process during this period and an update on how its governance will work will be provided shortly.

The Council will keep its arrangements under continual review, having regard to guidance as it emerges.

You can view the individual reports for this meeting by selecting the headings from the numbered list of items at the bottom of this page. Alternatively you can view the entire agenda by selecting 'Agenda Reports Pack' below.

Watch key Council meetings here

Venue: The Guildhall, Kingston upon Thames, KT1 1EU

Contact: Jean Cousens tel. 020 8547 5023  e-mail:  jean.cousens@kingston.gov.uk

Items
No. Item

43.

Presentation: London Living Wage Accreditation

Minutes:

The Council meeting opened with carols sung by pupils from St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School, Kingston.

 

 

Presentation:  London Living Wage Accreditation

 

The Mayor welcomed Ms Dilan Gurgur from the Living Wage Foundation who presented the Council with a plaque to mark its accreditation as a Living Wage employer (committing to pay the London Living Wage to all directly employed staff and those commissioned in the delivery of our services).  The Leader of the Council and the Portfolio Holder for Finance and Contracts received the plaque on behalf of the Council.

44.

Apologies

Minutes:

Apologies were received on behalf of Councillors Kim Bailey, Ian George, Jaesung Ha, and Malcolm Self.

45.

Declarations of Interest

Members are invited to declare any disclosable pecuniary interests and any other non- pecuniary interests (personal interests) relevant to items on this agenda.

 

Minutes:

Councillors Kevin Davis and Simon Edwards declared a personal interest in Minute Item 48 below (‘Petitions – The Rose Theatre’).

Reason: Councillors Davis and Edwards serve as Council-appointed Trustees of the Theatre.

 

Councillor Falchikov-Sumner declared a pecuniary interest in Minute Item 51 below (‘Motion – Local, Clean, Energy Generation’).

Reason: Councillor Falchikov-Sumner indicated that she had received a donation from a community energy company and the Motion relates to supporting community energy generation.

 

[Councillor Falchikov-Sumner withdrew from the Chamber during this item and took no part in the deliberations on it.]

46.

Minutes

To confirm as a correct record the minutes of the meeting of the Council held on 15 October 2019.

 

 

Minutes:

RESOLVED that the minutes of the meeting held on 15 October 2019 be signed as a correct record.

47.

Mayor's Announcements

Minutes:

Appointment of Joint Director of Children’s Services

The Mayor announced the appointment of Mr Ian Dodds as the new Joint Director of Children’s Services for Kingston and Richmond Councils.

A group of young people had been involved in the recruitment process (the ‘Recruit Crew’) and some of these young people were in attendance at the meeting.  The Mayor presented certificates to Spencer, Abi, Lydia, Aiden and George, to mark their involvement in this important appointment.

 

Mayor’s Charity

The Mayor asked anyone who might be intending to dispose of their old mobile phones over the Christmas period to retain them until mid-January when details of collection points across the borough would be publicised where freepost envelopes could be collected for phones to be sent to the GSUK recycling plant where they will be data-wiped, to be used again, or stripped for parts. The local e-waste recycling company, Genuine Solutions, will run this project and contribute funds to the Mayor’s Charitable Trust. 

 

Mayor’s Charity events in 2020 will include:

·           the Mayor's Charity Ball will be held at the Hilton DoubleTree hotel on Friday 27 March

·           On Monday 30 March there will be a special evening performance at the Rose Theatre in aid of the Mayor's Charitable Trust

 

General Election candidates

The Mayor thanked all the candidates who had stood in the Kingston & Surbiton and Richmond Park constituencies during the previous week’s General Election, and congratulated Ed Davey and Sarah Olney on their election to Parliament.

 

Director, Communities

The Mayor congratulated Stephen Evans, Director, Communities, on his recent promotion to the position of Chief Executive of Norwich City Council and wished him well on his new role.

 

48.

Public Questions

No public questions have been received by the deadline set out in Council’s Meeting Procedure Rule 17(A).

 

Minutes:

Procedure Rule 17(A) allows for public questions to be submitted 7 clear days before the Council meeting. 

 

No public questions had been submitted for the deadline.

49.

Petitions pdf icon PDF 75 KB

 

           

6.1         To receive petitions submitted by Councillors, or by members of the public who live, work or study in the Borough on a matter in relation to which the Council has powers or duties or which affects the Royal Borough.  The petition must contain at least 20 signatures, and notice of the intention to submit the petition must be given in writing to democratic.services@kingston.gov.uk by 10am the day before the meeting.  The petitioner will have up to 2 minutes speaking time to present the petition.  Up to 5 petitions can be presented at the meeting which will be presented in order of the number of signatories. (Any remaining petitions can be submitted, without speaking, and will be processed in accordance with the Petition Scheme)

 

6.2         To debate a petition concerning The Rose Theatre with reference to a report at Appendix A of the agenda (to follow in the 2nd despatch).  

 

Minutes:

49.1    No notification had been received of any petition of over 20 signatures for submission.

 

49.2    There was one petition for debate at the meeting.

 

At the Council meeting on 9 July 2019 the petition entitled ‘Save Kingston’s Rose Theatre’ was submitted by Dr Phil Bevin.  The online petition on the 38 degrees website (at the time of finalisation of the report to Council) had 16,205 signatures, of which it had been verified that over 500 were RBK postcode signatories.  The wording of the petition was as follows:

“Due to Council cuts, the beloved Rose Theatre may be forced to close: the Council "will strip the Rose Theatre of its £265,000 annual funding by 2022 and will not replace a £147,000 bursary, which it paid the final instalment of this year".*  This is at a time when the Council is ploughing millions into its reserves and raising its Councillors' allowances. We the undersigned know that Kingston Council is not bankrupt; it has the money to save the Rose -- the cultural heart of Kingston -- and must not cut its funding.  I personally visit The Rose a lot with my wife. There have been some fantastic productions and it's a great night out that's affordable! It has strong connections to organisations across Kingston, including with the University. It really is a centre of culture and would be a tragedy to lose it.

* https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/rose-theatre-kingston-closing-c

ouncil-funding-sir-peter-hall-a4140701.html ”

 

The petition was dealt with in accordance with the provisions of the Petitions Scheme as it was in July.  Dr Phil Bevin presented the petition at the Council meeting and it was discussed with reference to a report by the Director, Communities which had been submitted in the 2nd Despatch Agenda pack.

The report indicated that, following the council's statement in June 2019, which had reiterated the importance of The Rose Theatre to the borough and committed to the continuation of financial support, discussions about a new long term funding agreement have been taking place between the council and the theatre.  The future funding for the Rose has to be considered against other competing pressures and priorities on the council’s budget.   As such, final agreement on the new deal between the council and the Rose will be confirmed as part of the Council's budget setting process and by the Rose Board in February 2020.  Both the council and the theatre are confident that an agreement can be reached which takes into account the challenges and opportunities faced by both organisations.   The council's current five year contract with The Rose comes to an end in April 2020.  The council will negotiate a new contract which is consistent with the need to make savings but also recognises the challenges faced by the theatre. The contract will place community benefits at its core and ensure that cultural opportunities are available across the borough.  The council is also working with The Rose to ensure the theatre has a robust business case in place that  ...  view the full minutes text for item 49.

50.

Air Quality Citizens' Assembly pdf icon PDF 70 KB

 

To receive a presentation from the Citizens’ Assembly representatives and to note the report at Appendix B and Annex 1 of the report (which will be included in the 2nd despatch)which will set out the Assembly’s recommendations, to be referred for further consideration at the February 2020 meeting of the Environment and Sustainable Transport Committee.

 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Council considered a cover report by the Director, Communities and the Preliminary Report from the Kingston Citizens’ Assembly on Air Quality.  The Preliminary Report had been circulated, as Annex 1 to the report, after the publication of the agenda, within a 2nd despatch agenda pack, containing material considered potentially sensitive in relation to the Pre-Election Publicity restrictions, which was therefore published on 13 December, after the General Elections.]

The Assembly had brought together 38 randomly selected residents from the borough for two weekends during November and December 2019 to develop recommendations in response to the question: ‘How do we collectively improve air quality in the borough?  Poor air quality is an important issue for Kingston; it contributes to shortened life expectancy and disproportionately impacts the most vulnerable.  Therefore, refreshing the Kingston Air Quality Action Plan, through participatory democracy with the community, had been identified as one of the priorities within the Council’s Corporate Plan 2019 - 2023. 

The assembly had been overseen by an independent advisory group which had been tasked with providing advice and evidence which was accurate, balanced and unbiased, and which comprised: Professor Marta Blangiardo (Professor in Biostatics at the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatics, Imperial College London; Stephen Moorcroft, Director of Air Quality Consultants Ltd, Professor Prashant Kumar, Chair in Air Quality and Health and Founder Director of Global Centre for Clean Air Research at the University of Surrey; and William Hicks, PhD research student at Kings College, London.

Across the two weekends, the citizens’ assembly had heard a range of evidence relating to the impact of air pollution and different possible solutions for tackling it.  Assembly members developed five recommendations, each recommendation gaining over 85% support or strong support from the assembly. 

A number of representatives of the Assembly were present at the Council meeting in the public gallery.  In order to allow participants from the Assembly to address the Council meeting, the Council agreed to suspend Meeting Procedure Rules and received short presentations from:

·         Mr Steve Robinson, of the Involve Foundation (a leading charity putting people at the heart of decision-making, which had designed the process for the assembly and facilitated it) who explained how the assembly had worked

·         Assembly members, Angela and Philippa, who summarised some of its highlights and findings.

The Assembly recommendations were to:

1.    Remove pollutants within school boundaries;

2.    Prioritise changes to planning rules and enforcement to place indoor and outdoor air quality as the highest priority;

3.    Plan to urgently invest in greener and accessible transport and infrastructure for all;

4.    Increase residents’ awareness of air pollution and encourage positive behaviour change;

5.    Accelerate the transition to sustainable vehicles.

For each recommendation, there were a series of related actions, 26 in all.  All but one of these actions had gained over 75% support or strong support from the assembly members.  In January the Involve Foundation will provide a full and independent report on the Assembly and its findings which will be presented to and discussed at the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 50.

51.

Motion

In accordance with Procedure Rule 8(A)(5), the Council will debate a motion which has been submitted by Members of the Council.

This alternates, from meeting to meeting, between a motion submitted on behalf of the Administration and a motion submitted on behalf of Opposition Members of the Council.

A Motion relating to ‘Local, Clean, Energy Generation’ has been received from the Administration (the Liberal Democrat Group) and the details will be included in the 2nd despatch

Proposed by Councillor Hilary Gander

Seconded by Councillor Emily Davey

 

 

Minutes:

(1)             In accordance with Procedure Rule 8(A)(5), the Council debated a Motion on ‘Local, Clean, Energy Generation’ which had been submitted by the Administration, and was proposed by Councillor Hilary Gander and seconded by Councillor Emily Davey.  [The details of the Motion had been included in the 2nd Despatch Agenda Pack, and Background Briefing Notes had been circulated prior to the Council meeting to assist Members to debate the Motion.]

(2)             Following comments from Councillor Hilary Gander and Councillor Kevin Davis, Councillor Gander (with Councillor Davey’s concurrence) accepted two amendments as follows to clarify the wording of the Motion:

·         to replace the words ‘from the Hogsmill in Kingston’ with the words  ‘from the Thames Water wastewater treatment plant in Norbiton

·         to replace the word ‘currently’ with the word ‘previously’ to read ‘to support the Local Electricity Bill, previously supported by a cross-party group of 115 MPs

(3)             The Motion, incorporating the above two amendments, was agreed unanimously as follows:

‘Local, Clean, Energy Generation’

‘This Council notes:

i.       the efforts RBK is already making to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote renewable energy within our communities;

ii.      the project currently being undertaken to enable the delivery of a district heating network using waste heat from the Thames Water wastewater treatment plant in Norbiton to deliver renewable energy to new homes and commercial buildings;

iii.    that councils can play a central role in creating sustainable communities, particularly through the provision of locally generated renewable electricity, and the Power for People campaign for the Local Electricity Bill which, if made law, would empower community groups to start up and sell their clean electricity to local people by establishing a Right to Local Supply.

‘This Council further notes:

i.       there is a need for more clean, green community energy; and

·         the very large financial setup and running costs involved in selling locally generated renewable electricity to local customers result in it being impossible for local renewable electricity generators to do so,

·         that making these financial costs proportionate to the scale of a renewable electricity supplier’s operation would create significant opportunities for councils to be providers of locally generated renewable electricity directly to local people, businesses and organisations, and

·         that revenues received by councils that became local renewable electricity providers could be used to help fund local greenhouse gas emissions reduction measures and to help improve local services and facilities.

‘This Council resolves:

i.       to support the Local Electricity Bill, previously supported by a cross-party group of 115 MPs, and which, if made law, would make the setup and running costs of selling renewable electricity to local customers proportionate by establishing a Right to Local Supply; and:

·         to write to local MPs, asking them to support the Bill, and

·         to write to the organisers of the campaign for the Bill, Power for People expressing its support

·         to monitor the stages of the Bill and take a Report to EAST Committee (at a future date).’

 

[Councillor Falchikov-Sumner, who had declared a  ...  view the full minutes text for item 51.

52.

Community Motion pdf icon PDF 83 KB

To debate a Community Motion concerning Engagement with reference to a report at Appendix C in the agenda pack (to follow in the 2nd despatch). 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(1)          A Community Motion had been submitted on 14 October 2019, which had been too late to meet the deadline for submission to the 15 October meeting.  Under the constitutional provisions still in place at that time, namely former Standing Order 7(A), the Council was obliged to consider any valid motions at its next Ordinary meeting wherever practicable and it was therefore scheduled for this meeting.  The Mayor requested Council to suspend its current Rules of Procedure in order to allow this Community Motion to be considered in accordance with those former provisions.  (The wording of the community motion refers to constitutional provisions at the time it was submitted.)

 

(2)          The Community Motion entitled ‘Demand Better Resident Engagement’ was submitted by Mr James Giles and supported by 523 signatories.  It stated:

“Demanding Better on Engagement

‘Under Standing Order 7A of the Council's constitution, we, the undersigned, hereby submit a Community Motion for discussion at Full Council. If for any reason the Council are unable to debate this under Standing Order 7A, this is to be considered under Standing Order 7, as a petition.

 

This Council notes:

i.    the ability for residents, students or workers under Thurrock Council to call in decisions with a threshold of 10 signatures;

ii.   the vote of the Council in 2016, resolving to scrap any proposals to remove the Fountain Roundabout in New Malden;

iii. the vote of the Council in 2019, resolving to scrap proposed hikes in CPZ increases and seek a ‘better way forward’;

iv. that the ability for residents and community organisations in Kingston to submit deputations have led to a number of positive outcomes in the borough, including over £30k extra revenue for the Council in the last year;

v.   that the Council’s petition system requires residents to register an account with the portal in order to sign a petition;

vi. the Liberal Democrats were elected on a manifesto of being a “listening” authority that would re-introduce scrutiny

“This Council believes:

i.    Thurrock’s model is to be held as a ‘gold-standard’ of call-ins, producing constructive solutions to issues in the borough led by residents;

ii.   It is important that the public can trust the local authority, which means respecting votes held by the local authority on matters including the Fountain Roundabout and the scrapping of proposed CPZ hikes;

iii. It would be a betrayal of public trust to use any constitutional changes, which restrict residents’ rights to engage at strategic committees and Full Council, as a means to push through controversial policies which have previously been voted against;

iv. Deputations serve as a means for members of the public to engage with all members at Full Council, and that the topical statements they bring are incredibly worthwhile;

v.   It is wrong to restrict the use of modern technology, in regard to resident engagement, by refusing petitions collected on sites used worldwide, such as Change.Org and 38 Degrees; and

vi. Any Liberal Democrat councillor who votes for constitutional changes that restrict the rights  ...  view the full minutes text for item 52.

53.

Member Questions

In accordance with Procedure Rule 6 (1 & 2) replies will be given to questions of which notice has been given  which may be addressed to the Mayor, the Leader of the Council, Portfolio Holders,  the Leader of the Opposition, Chairs of the Standing and Neighbourhood Committees and Members representing the Council on Outside Bodies.

 

Minutes:

 

In accordance with Procedure Rule 6 (1 & 2), replies were given as follows to Council questions:

 

 

By:      Councillor Dennis Goodship

To        Councillor Lorraine Dunstone, Chair, South of the Borough Neighbourhood

            Committee

Question:

The Meyer Homes site has recently been bought by Guinness Partnership.  Could you outline why this is such good news for residents?

 

Reply:

The Guinness Partnership purchasing the former government offices in Tolworth from Meyer Homes is a new opportunity. 

With Guinness being one of the largest affordable housing and care providers in England they will be looking to exceed the number of affordable homes that are currently approved on the site and this is likely to include London Affordable Rent and shared ownership.  Along with the proposed high quality of homes, there will also be a strong focus on the quality of public realm.

We welcome The Guinness Partnership to Tolworth and look forward to working with them to provide more affordable housing for local people.

 

 

By:      Councillor Andreas Kirsch

To:       Councillor Liz Green, Leader of the Council

Question:

How many of our EU citizens have now applied for settled status and how are we encouraging the remainder to ensure they sign up?

 

Reply:

Whilst we are fortunate here across South West London with 3 Lib Dem MPs, I recognise that the national Tory majority and the inevitability of Brexit, so this question and how we support our EU friends and neighbours, is very timely and vitally important.

Based on Government data published in early November, between August 2018 and September 2019, there were 8,650 applications for settled status from Kingston residents.  The 2018 electoral data, identified that there were 10,939 EU national registered voters, which means that potentially 79% of Kingston’s EU national residents have applied for EU settled status.  Clearly there is a concern because that leaves 21% or potentially more because they may not have all been on the register that we still need to be able to contact and see if they wish to go for settled status.

The Council will continue promoting the scheme through a variety of different communication channels such as through, social media, posters/flyers in key public service areas and the distribution of leaflets directly to residents and businesses, particularly where we know the addresses of those who are actively on the register as a EU national

 

In the New Year, the Council will also be working more closely with a Government contracted charity that will be enable to help us identify and support the  more vulnerable EU national residents to apply for settled status, if they wish to do so. 

So I can confirm that nearly 80% have applied for settled status and that we are working very hard to ensure that all our friends and neighbours from the EU can apply for free status through the free service that we offer here at the Council for Kingston’s residents.

 

 

 

By:      Councillor Steph Archer

To:       Councillor Hilary Gander, Portfolio Holder for Environment and Sustainable Transport

Question:  ...  view the full minutes text for item 53.

54.

Local Government Boundary Commission Review pdf icon PDF 69 KB

To consider recommendations relating to the Council's proposed submission to the Local Government Boundary Commission concerning future warding arrangements as set out in the report at Appendix D in the agenda pack (to follow in the 2nd despatch). 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Council considered a report setting out proposals for recommendation to the Boundary Commission in respect of the future arrangement of ward boundaries within the Borough.  The proposals were set out in Annex 1 to the report, entitled ‘Electoral Review of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames: Warding Pattern Arrangements – Submission to the Local Government Boundary Commission for England’.  (The report and Annex had been circulated after the General Elections on 12 December ie after the publication of the main agenda pack, in the 2nd Despatch Agenda Pack, as the contents had been considered potentially sensitive in relation to the legal restrictions on Pre-Election publicity.)

The Local Government Boundary Commission for England is currently undertaking a periodic review of the pattern of ward boundaries in the Royal Borough.  The purpose of the review is to ensure an equality of the number of voters in each ward, and that wards reflect community identity and promote effective local government.  All interested parties had been invited to submit proposals for the achievement of these criteria to the Boundary Commission by 18 December. 

Since the previous Boundary Commission review, undertaken in 1999, the Council has operated with 48 Councillors divided into 16 wards.   In accordance with the uniform requirements in London at the time of the last review, each of these wards are represented by three Councillors.  Elections to the whole Council take place every four years with the next scheduled for May 2022. 

On the basis of the forecast electorate for 2025, which projects a target of one Councillor per 2,572 electors, six of the 16 existing wards (38%) would at that point breach the maximum variation of +/- 10% if no change were to be made to the current warding arrangements.  This would be a sufficiently significant deviation from the guidelines to trigger intervention by the Local Government Boundary Commission

A detailed draft submission had been prepared, setting out a preferred pattern of ward boundaries and associated arrangements, including the number of wards, the number of Councillors within each ward and the names of the wards.  The draft submission recommended a move from 16 three Member wards to 19 wards, of which 10 would be represented by three Members and nine by two Members.

Changes were proposed in respect of every existing ward.  In some cases these are relatively minor adjustments to resolve boundary anomalies and meet voter equality requirements, but in other parts of the borough significant change is recommended in order to best reflect community identity and voter equality and enhance effective governance.  A summary of the recommendations is set out below:

Proposed Ward

Number of councillors

Target Electorate

Forecast Electorate

% Variation

Alexandra Park

2

5,144

5,052

-1.8%

Berrylands

2

5,144

5,375

+4.5%

Canbury Gardens

2

5,144

5,008

-2.7%

Chessington South

3

7,716

7,563

-2%

Coombe Hill

2

5,144

4,826

-6.2%

Coombe Vale

3

7,716

7,363

-4.6%

Hook & Chessington North

3

7,716

8,101

+5%

King George’s & Sunray

2

5,144

5,343

+3.9%

Kingston Gate

3

7,716

8,052  ...  view the full minutes text for item 54.

55.

Review of Polling Districts and Polling Places pdf icon PDF 68 KB

To consider the report at Appendix E of the agenda

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Council considered a report which set out the findings of a review of Polling Districts and Polling Places within the Borough which had been undertaken in order to comply with the statutory obligation to do so by 31 January 2020.  The report explained that the review had been undertaken with ‘a light touch’ as it will be necessary to undertake a full and comprehensive review of Polling Districts and Polling Places later in 2020 to take account of the changes in ward boundaries which are likely to arise following the conclusion of the review being conducted by the Local Government Boundary Commission for England (as considered earlier in the meeting – please refer to Minute 54 above).

 

Only two representations had been received during the course of a public consultation exercise. (one relating to Berrylands and one relating to Norbiton ward) and these were detailed in paragraph 13 of the report.  For both issues it was considered more appropriate to review these as part of the full review, once the new ward boundaries are confirmed arising from the above Boundary Commission review.

 

Only one change was therefore recommended at this point, namely the designation of the Cornerstone Church Kingston on Canbury Park Road as the Polling Place for Polling District TB in Canbury ward, replacing the Multicultural Day Centre (MILAAP) in Acre Road (which is no longer available for use as a Polling Place because the Day Centre has been relocated).

 

RESOLVED that -

1.            the Council’s existing scheme of Polling Districts and Polling Places be reconfirmed, with the amendment that the Cornerstone Church Kingston, 234-236a Canbury Park Road be designated as the Polling Place for Polling District TB, Canbury ward; and

 

2.            a further detailed review of the Council’s Polling District and Polling Place arrangements be undertaken following the conclusion of the ongoing review of ward boundaries by the Local Government Boundary Commission for England.

 

Voting - unanimous

56.

Amendments to the Constitution

 

13.1    Terms of reference of Senior Staff Panel 

 

Recommended that a new provision is added to the functions of the Senior Staff Panel (Part 3A of the Constitution - Responsibility for Functions) to provide that all Assistant Director appointments are made by the Panel.  

 

13.2    Public Questions at Meetings of the Health and Wellbeing Board 


Recommended that Procedure Rule no 17 (B) (1) within Part 4A (Meeting Procedure Rules) within the Constitution is amended as follows to allow public questions at the Health and Wellbeing Board (reflecting the similar intention under Rule no 17 (C) (1) which applies to public speaking on Agenda items):

 

(B)         PUBLIC QUESTIONS AT MEETINGS OF COMMITTEES   


(1) A period of up to 30 minutes shall be allowed at each meeting of Strategic Committees, Neighbourhood Committees (other than Neighbourhood Planning Sub-Committees) and the Health and Wellbeing Board, and 15 minutes at each meeting of the Audit, Governance and Standards Committee, during which any resident of the Borough or representative of organisations operating within the Borough (other than Members of the Council) may ask questions on matters relevant to the Committee.

 

[This is to clarify that the Public Questions arrangements agreed for strategic committees apply to the Health and Wellbeing Board.]

 

 

Minutes:

The Council considered amendments to the Constitution which had been recommended for clarification.

 

RESOLVED that:

1.            a new provision is added to the functions of the Senior Staff Panel (Part 3A of the Constitution - Responsibility for Functions) to provide that all Assistant Director appointments are made by the Panel; and

 

2.            Procedure Rule no 17 (B) (1) within Part 4A (Meeting Procedure Rules) of the Constitution is amended as follows to clarify that the Public Questions arrangements agreed for strategic committees apply also to the Health and Wellbeing Board:

 

(B)       PUBLIC QUESTIONS AT MEETINGS OF COMMITTEES  

 

(1) A period of up to 30 minutes shall be allowed at each meeting of Strategic Committees, Neighbourhood Committees (other than Neighbourhood Planning Sub-Committees) and the Health and Wellbeing Board, and 15 minutes at each meeting of the Audit, Governance and Standards Committee, during which any resident of the Borough or representative of organisations operating within the Borough (other than Members of the Council) may ask questions on matters relevant to the Committee.

 

Voting - unanimous

57.

Designation of Chief Education Officer pdf icon PDF 45 KB

The Council is required by law to appoint certain statutory officers as listed in Article 10 of the Council’s Constitution, including the statutory role of ‘Chief Education Officer’; in this Council, the post of Director of Children’s Services has been designated as the post which undertakes this statutory function.

 

Kingston and Richmond Councils have appointed Ian Dodds (currently Managing Director of Achieving for Children) as the new joint Director of Children’s Services (DCS) for both boroughs, with effect from January 2020.  Mr Dodds will therefore be designated as undertaking the ‘Chief Education Officer’ for this Council from taking up the DCS position.

 

[This appointment follows interim arrangements in 2019 (with individual Directors of Children’s Services for each borough), during which Pauline Maddison has undertaken the role of Interim Director of Children’s Services for Kingston Council.  Both Councils have agreed to return to the joint DCS model which fits with the Achieving for Children joint services delivery model.]

 

Minutes:

In the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, the post of Director of Children’s Services has been designated as the post which undertakes the statutory function of ‘Chief Education Officer’ (one of the statutory officers listed in Article 10 of the Council’s Constitution.

 

Kingston and Richmond Councils have appointed Ian Dodds (currently Managing Director of Achieving for Children) as the new joint Director of Children’s Services (DCS) for both boroughs, with effect from January 2020.  Mr Dodds will therefore be designated as undertaking the ‘Chief Education Officer’ for this Council from taking up the DCS position.

 

(During 2019 there had been interim arrangements, with separate Directors of Children’s Services for each borough; and Pauline Maddison had undertaken the role of Interim Director of Children’s Services for Kingston Council.  Both Councils had agreed to return to the joint DCS model which fits with the Achieving for Children joint services delivery model.)

 

RESOLVED that Mr Ian Dodd’s appointment as the Council’s new Joint Director of Children's Services (a role which encompasses the responsibilities of the Chief Education Officer) be noted and endorsed.

 

Voting - unanimous

 

58.

Appointments to Committees, Panels and other bodies pdf icon PDF 45 KB

The Council is RECOMMENDED to make the following appointments:

 

Health and Wellbeing Board

 

(1) Jessica Thoms, the new Director of Commissioning and Partnerships in Achieving for Children (AfC), to be appointed as the AfC representative (a non-voting advisory role) with effect from 1 March 2020.  (Charis Penfold will continue to be the alternate member.)

 

(2) Ian Dodds (who was the previous AfC representative on the Board), having recently been appointed as Director of Children’s Services, will now be an ex officio member of the Board in that capacity.

 

(3) Sanja Djeric-Kane (the new CEO of Kingston Voluntary Action) to be appointed as the Voluntary Sector representative on the Board, replacing Patricia Turner (with Gurpreet Kelia of KVA to be appointed as Sanja’s alternate).

 

(4) Dr Charlotte Harrison to be appointed as the South West London and St George’s Mental Health Trust non-voting advisory member on the Board (replacing Dr Mark Potter).

 

 

 

Minutes:

 

Late Material had been circulated on this item.

 

RESOLVED that the following appointments be approved:

 

Health and Wellbeing Board

 

i.              Jessica Thoms, the new Director of Commissioning and Partnerships in Achieving for Children (AfC) - appointed as the AfC representative (a non-voting advisory role) with effect from 1 March 2020.  (Charis Penfold will continue to be the alternate member.)

 

ii.            Ian Dodds (previously the AfC representative on the Board) - to serve as an ex officio member of the Board in his capacity as Director of Children’s Services

 

iii.           SanjaDjeric-Kane (the new CEO of Kingston Voluntary Action) - appointed as the Voluntary Sector representative on the Board, replacing Patricia Turner (with GurpreetKelia of KVA as Sanja’s alternate).

 

iv.           Dr Charlotte Harrison - appointed as the South West London and St George’s Mental Health Trust non-voting advisory member on the Board (replacing Dr Mark Potter).

 

Children’s and Adults’ Care and Education Committee

v.            Councillor Fiona Boult - appointed on to the Committee to replace Councillor Malcolm Self.

 

 

Voting - unanimous

59.

Urgent Items authorised by the Mayor

 

 

To consider any items which, in the view of the Mayor, should be dealt with as a matter of urgency because of special circumstances in accordance with S100B(4) of the Local Government Act 1972.

 

(Likely to include the items shown as 2nd despatch.)

 

 

 

 

Background Papers  held by Democratic Support 020 8547 5023

 

  • Relevant Committee Agendas.

Minutes:

There being no urgent or exempt items, the Mayor closed the meeting at 10:10pm, inviting Members and officers to the Mayor’s Parlour for festive refreshments.

 

60.

Annex 1 Written Replies to Council Questions

Minutes:

Annex 1

Written Replies to Council Questions

 

 

By:      Councillor Sam Foulder-Hughes

To:       Councillor Andreas Kirsch, Portfolio Holder for Community and Governance

 

Question:

How many new people registered to vote in the general election compared to 2017 and how many uni students in halls registered?

 

Written reply:

During the statutory election timetable there are three updates to the electoral register.

The numbers of people added to the electoral register via the three updates for both the 2017 and the 2019 general elections are set out below.  These statistics do not include any “duplicate applications” (i.e. it does not include those people already registered who make a further application when they didn’t need to).  The statistics are borough wide and also include EU citizens who do not have voting rights at UK Parliamentary Elections.

 

Total number of properties classified as Student Halls of Residences (2017): 3206

Total number of properties classified as Student Halls of Residences (2019): 3590

 

Total number of electors registered in Student Halls of Residences (2017):   203

Total number of electors registered in Student Halls of Residences (2019): 1225

 

The increase in the numbers of students registered reflects closer working with Kingston University, as well as a new electoral registration software which allows us to email potential electors to encourage them to register to vote.

 

 

By:      Councillor Katrina Lidbetter

To:       Councillor Andreas Kirsch, Portfolio Holder for Community and Governance

 

Question:

Whilst fireworks bring much enjoyment to some people, residents are extremely concerned about the misuse of fireworks and their impact on animals.   Is there any action the Council can take in the future to mitigate the risks and encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock quieter fireworks for public display and home use?

 

Written reply:

The manufacture, storage, sale and use of fireworks in the UK are governed primarily by the Explosive Regulations 2014, the Fireworks Regulations 2004 (under powers delegated from the Fireworks Act 2003), Pyrotechnic Articles (Safety) Regulations 2015 and the Explosives Act 1875.

It is illegal to sell ‘adult’ fireworks to a person under 18, and the type of fireworks you can buy and how they perform, including for example the maximum noise levels are all prescribed by the above legislation (120dB for commercial display).

There are 2 types of licence issued by the council, neither of which can limit the noise level of fireworks sold. The licences are for storage of fireworks and/or sales outside of specified periods.  The specified periods include periods of time around fireworks night, New Year’s Eve, Diwali and Chinese New Year.

Outside of the specified periods, you can only buy fireworks from businesses that hold a specific all-year-round sales licence.

It’s against the law for anyone to set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am, except on certain occasions.  The law says you must not set off or throw fireworks (including sparklers) in the street or other public places.  You must not set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am, except for:

o    Bonfire Night, when the cut off  ...  view the full minutes text for item 60.